Follicular Lymphoma

Follicular lymphoma (FL) is typically a slow-growing or indolent form of non- Hodgkin lymphomaOne of the two major types of lymphoma that begin in the lymph nodes and tissues of the lymphatic system. All other lymphomas are classified as non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Hodgkin lymphoma has characteristic cell, the Reed-Sternberg cell, seen by the pathologist under the microscope when looking at the tissue from the biopsy. (NHL) that arises from B-lymphocytes, making it a B-cell lymphoma. This lymphoma subtype accounts for 20 to 30 percent of all NHL cases.

Common symptoms of FL include enlargement of the lymph nodesSmall bean-shaped glands located in the small vessels of the lymphatic system. There are thousands of lymph nodes located throughout the body, with clusters of them in the neck, under the arms, the chest, abdomen and groin. Lymph nodes filter lymph fluid, trapping and destroying potentially harmful bacteria and viruses. in the neck, underarms, abdomen, or groin, as well as fatigueA decreased capacity for activity that is often accompanied by feelings of weariness, sleepiness or irritability., shortness of breath, night sweats, and weight loss. Often, patients with FL have no obvious symptoms of the disease at diagnosis.

Follicular lymphoma is usually not considered to be curable, but more of a chronic disease. Patients can live for many years with this form of lymphoma.

To learn more about FL, download the Follicular Lymphoma Fact Sheet or visit FocusOnFL.org.